Monday, December 22, 2014

DIY // {Tulle Skirt}

This past weekend we went to my husband's Christmas party. I didn't really have to think too hard about what I wanted to wear. I instantly knew it had to be a tulle skirt! 

There is something so feminine and delicate about a tulle skirt. I believe everyone woman should own one. Once you slip it on you just can't help but feel beautiful. There are a lot of boutiques selling them but the prices can be steep. I am here to let you know that it is possible to make one of your own for a very affordable price. If you're interested in creating this lovely skirt check out the steps below!








 What you will need:
1. Tulle 6+ yards (depending on how long you want your skirt to be and how many layers you want. I got about 10 yards and my skirt had 6 layers of tulle and one layer of a shiny polyester lining.

2. Lining 1.5 yards (try to get a fabric that will not snag. I chose a stretchy polyester material in ivory to match the tulle that gave it a little extra sheen)

3. Elastic band (I used a 1.5" wide band. I bought this one at JoAnn's and it had gold thread which I loved but they sell plain ones as well.)

4. Pins
5. Measuring tape
6. Scissors
7. Sewing Machine




1. Most likely when you bought your tulle it was folded in half  and rolled on a bolt. It was then measured out as one long piece of fabric and folded up for you to take. However, you'll want your tulle in sheets that lie one on top of the other like sheets of paper. I knew I wanted my skirt to be 22" long. So, I doubled that length and added half to ensure I had enough material for my waist ( 22" + 22" + 11" = 53"). The length of my sheets came out to 53" long. The width remained the same because I left it folded the way it came on the bolt.  You should cut the material for your lining the same way.


2. Once you cut your tulle into sheets open them and lay them on top of each other. Then take you lining and lay it on the very top with the back side facing up.



3. Now fold the layers in half along the length. 


4. Fold the layers in half again into a square.


5. You should now have a square. 


6. Next measure your waist and divide that number by 6.24. This will give you your radius. For example if your waist is 27" then divide that by 6.24 = 4.32. I added 1 inch to give myself more room to gather the fabric. Now, measure from the corner of the square that has been folded. This will become the center of your circle. You need to pin following the shape of the red line making sure that the measurement is the same from one side to the other. 

7. Measure the length you want your skirt to be from the end of the waist radius. Again, you need to pin following the red dotted line then cut. 



8. Now carefully remove your pins and open up the layers to form a circle. You should have a hole in the center for your waist. 



9. Pin all the way around following the center circle. 



10. Take the elastic band and cut it to the measurement of your waist. I subtracted one inch so it would sit snug around my waist when I wore it rather than sit loosely. For example if your waist is 27" cut 26" of elastic. You can the choose to sew the two ends together and then sew it to the skirt. I left the ends undone because it was easier to maneuver. 


11. The next step can be done a number of ways. You can make a basting stitch along the small circle and gather the fabric if you wish. However, I skipped that and went straight to sewing the material to the elastic band. You will need to stretch the band as you sew. The key for me here was to go slow and steady. 

I started sewing the band to the skirt about a centimeter from the end of the band. I sewed all the way around stretching as I went along. 

Once you get to the end of the circle you may have elastic left over. Cut the excess but leave a centimeter and over lap the ends. Sew the ends to finish. 



Here is a view of the overlapping ends. 





While the tulle will have a raw edge you won't have to worry about it fraying. If you're concerned about your lining you can had a quick hem. 

So here is the final product!